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Details
Neuralgia
What is it?
When pain signals reach your brain along a nerve, you sense the pain as coming from whatever part of your body is served by that nerve. If the real cause is irritation or damage to the nerve itself, anywhere along its route, the pain still seems to come from that part of your body. For example, inflammation of the trigeminal nerve, which is a carrier of sensations and which enters the skull near the ear, produces spasmodic pain in one side of the face, called neuralgia.
Symptoms:
Spasmodic pain in parts of the body, pain on one side of the face.
Conventional Practice:
Having diagnosed the cause, a doctor may then prescribe painkillers. Alternatively he may apply electrical impulses passed through the skin from a portable instrument which anaesthetise the nerve. Another method is an injection of phenol into the nerve to destroy the hypersensitive fibres.
Alternative Treatments:
  Acupressure
  Acupressure is a mixture of massage and acupuncture, and is thought to be the forerunner of acupuncture. Instead of inserting needles, practitioners use firm thumb or fingertip massage on pain relieving pressure points. Acupressure is used to balance a flow of energy called Qi, which is believed to run through invisible channels known as meridians. More Info
  Aromatherapy
  Treating illness with highly concentrated oils extracted from plants is known as aromatherapy. These highly scented extracts-called essences or essential oils-contain the substances that give plants their smell. Aromatherapists believe that many also have medicinal properties. More Info
   



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